[home][rumors and news][model release matrix][dealer network][desktop calendar][exhaust notes][tov forums][links][search][sponsors][garage][login]

Tire Rack Upgrade Garage
 Search for a Dealer:
 Canadian Flag US Flag
 Honda Acura
 ZIP  
BBC: Honda set to close Swindon factory in 2022
More.......................
Nikkei: Honda enters agreement with CATL for battery supply contract through 2027
More.......................
Acura Marks 30 Years Since Debut of Iconic NSX Supercar
More.......................
American Honda reports January sales
More.......................
Acura Marks 15th Anniversary of Super Handling All-Wheel Drive™
More.......................
Honda releases pricing and EPA information for 2019 Passport
More.......................
American Honda Reports December Sales
More.......................
American Honda Reports November Sales
More.......................
Type R --> Re: DC-R
Join Discussion......
Today's Reading Links --> Re: Swindon in peril
Join Discussion......
General Talk --> Re: Timid AHM marketing
Join Discussion......
Professional Motorsports --> Re: F1 - 2019 Pre-Season Testing - Days 1-4
Join Discussion......
General Talk --> Re: Honda Loses a $38 Million Liability Lawsuit
Join Discussion......
Today's Reading Links --> Re: Poor reliability scores for Honda and Acura
Join Discussion......
TOV Asia --> Re: Honda JP Sales 2018: Hybrids make up 55% of reg. cars
Join Discussion......
General Talk --> Re: Honda's new sub-brand Honda e
Join Discussion......
Amateur Racing & Driving --> Re: My first helmet !
Join Discussion......
Type R --> Re: Honda closing UK plant that builds the Type R
Join Discussion......
General Talk --> Re: Original NSX prototype only had a SOHC V6 without VTEC
Join Discussion......
General Talk --> Re: Rumours that Honda will close its Swindon plant
Join Discussion......
General Talk --> Re: Sunny came home with a mission
Join Discussion......
Professional Motorsports --> Re: 2019 F1 Releases/Launches
Join Discussion......
Type R --> Re: Type R bike carrier
Join Discussion......
2019 Honda Passport PR Photo Gallery
Read Article....................
2019 Acura NSX PR Photo Gallery
Read Article....................
First Drive: 2019 Acura ILX
Read Article....................
2019 Acura ILX PR Photo Gallery
Read Article....................
First Drive: 2019 Honda Pilot
Read Article....................
2019 Honda Pilot PR Photo Gallery
Read Article....................

[fancy] [flat] [simple]
TOV Forums > TSX > > Re: Sales Position at Acura

Go to:

Viewing Threshold (What is this?)

Thread Page - [1] 2 3
Author
  Post New Thread
Hondatalover
Profile for Hondatalover
Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-04-2015 17:18
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Ugh, right after crossing 116K miles, I had to dish out $190 for a new alternator of which I still haven't gotten my core charge for.

-113K miles: Battery ($100)
-114K miles: Starter ($500)
-115K miles: Aux Adapter ($100)
-116K miles: Alternator ($190)

Oil is due at 117K but I checked it and it's a hair under the bottom dot on the dip stick. So that will be done asap.

This 'near 120K mile' maintenance and bills to pay (Insurance and cell phone) all at once... ugh. Its gotten my bank account well below a K24's idle rpm... :'(

Wish i was working at Performance Acura and just sold 3 cars right now... I think it's around $250 commission per car sold.



papapoly
Profile for papapoly
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-04-2015 19:44
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Hondatalover wrote:
Ugh, right after crossing 116K miles, I had to dish out $190 for a new alternator of which I still haven't gotten my core charge for.

-113K miles: Battery ($100)
-114K miles: Starter ($500)
-115K miles: Aux Adapter ($100)
-116K miles: Alternator ($190)

Oil is due at 117K but I checked it and it's a hair under the bottom dot on the dip stick. So that will be done asap.

This 'near 120K mile' maintenance and bills to pay (Insurance and cell phone) all at once... ugh. Its gotten my bank account well below a K24's idle rpm... :'(

Wish i was working at Performance Acura and just sold 3 cars right now... I think it's around $250 commission per car sold.





I agree it is painful. These are the hidden costs of car ownership. Look at it this way, you are getting a great lesson on things to come taxes, rent, mortgage, kids, food bills, medical bills etc. You have a great start while your peers won't know for a few more years.

owequitit
Profile for owequitit
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-04-2015 19:54
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Hondatalover wrote:
Ugh, right after crossing 116K miles, I had to dish out $190 for a new alternator of which I still haven't gotten my core charge for.

-113K miles: Battery ($100)
-114K miles: Starter ($500)
-115K miles: Aux Adapter ($100)
-116K miles: Alternator ($190)

Oil is due at 117K but I checked it and it's a hair under the bottom dot on the dip stick. So that will be done asap.

This 'near 120K mile' maintenance and bills to pay (Insurance and cell phone) all at once... ugh. Its gotten my bank account well below a K24's idle rpm... :'(

Wish i was working at Performance Acura and just sold 3 cars right now... I think it's around $250 commission per car sold.




Even most BMW's will go that far before blowing up.

Waldo
Profile for Waldo
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-04-2015 20:40
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
owequitit wrote:

Even most BMW's will go that far before blowing up.

Oh, I know. The Total Cost of Ownership of a BMW is way below that of any Honda product. /end sarcasm.

Hondatalover
Profile for Hondatalover
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-04-2015 22:07
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
I got a call & email from Acura today. I pressed for a job interview at the dealer. I hope to get a call back sometime in the coming weeks. Where I am is great and all, but I like the idea of making $300 on the spot with multiple chances a day vs waiting 2 weeks and relying on hours worked to make just as much. Sure there are other variables in play but I want to learn all I can so I can compare the two and make my mind up quickest. I very indecisive and end up making a blinded impulse decision IF I don't get enough info and have any reason of doubt.

Before I 'leave anyone' I'm going to have to consider all the things and the requirements and changes at a dealership vs retail outlet.

Big gulp for the big bucks....



owequitit
Profile for owequitit
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-04-2015 22:25
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Waldo wrote:
owequitit wrote:

Even most BMW's will go that far before blowing up.

Oh, I know. The Total Cost of Ownership of a BMW is way below that of any Honda product. /end sarcasm.



It isn't nearly as low as you assert it is. I own a Civic Si and anything other than an oil change runs me around $300-400 these days. Oil change and valve adjustment? $400. Transmission fluid change? $100. Coolant and brake fluid flush? $350. Timing belt? $1000-1500. Luckily I have a timing chain, but it too will need replaced at some point. Sound a little bit like BMW services? Everybody bitches about the cost of dealer maintenance on a BMW, but the reality is that Hondas are also expensive to have maintained at the dealer, and if you are a DIY guy, then the Bimmer parts are slightly more expensive, but not wildly so.

That said, I have MANY friends who drive Bimmers which will typically go 100-125K before they need major servicing.

Also, have you priced any of the components on his list lately? They aren't "small ticket items" even on a Honda, not to mention the overall point, which is the one you missed, which about how "reliable" Honda's cars are. Alternators, and starters shouldn't be failing at less than 150-200K miles on ANY Honda product. I have a 260K mile, 25 year old Honda Accord, and my starter still hums like the day I bought it. So does my alternator. If I had to start replacing $500 parts here and there, I would be PISSED because that isn't any better than a BMW.

The other major change versus the "old" Honda? They wouldn't have all failed at the same time. Major parts of the car exploding all at the same mileage is indicative of '90's GM, not 90's Honda, so it looks like the Detroit retreads have been able to undermine the only solid area Honda had left...

Maxtierney
Profile for Maxtierney
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-04-2015 23:01
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Sorry to hear about your woes. When it rains, it pours.

Unfortunately, Honda doesn't make any of those failed items. Denso, Mitsubishi, Johnson Control, etc. Suppliers are what kill most manufacturers nowadays. Cost cutting often kills reliability.

Maxtierney
Profile for Maxtierney
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-04-2015 23:06
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Forgot to mention the biggest offender, Takata.
owequitit
Profile for owequitit
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-04-2015 23:16
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Maxtierney wrote:
Sorry to hear about your woes. When it rains, it pours.

Unfortunately, Honda doesn't make any of those failed items. Denso, Mitsubishi, Johnson Control, etc. Suppliers are what kill most manufacturers nowadays. Cost cutting often kills reliability.



Honda didn't build those items on any of their old cars either. The suppliers build parts to the OEM's specifications, so while they might not make them directly, they do set the standard to which the supplier performs.

meyerk9
Profile for meyerk9
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-04-2015 23:32
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Nothing is built how it used to be. The mass production really kills reliability in cars, as well as build quality. Realistically, your car is pretty old.

Try to find a TV, Cell Phone, toaster, coffee pot, etc that will last 11 years nowadays.

God it sucks but it's the world we live in.

meyerk9
Profile for meyerk9
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-04-2015 23:36
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
I have to add, my 06 6MT with 182k on it hasn't needed anything other than routine maintenance and a water pump. Finally decided to do a valve adjustment on it yesterday. Probably could have let that go another 50k. I did also just have to put an upper control arm and sway bar links, but living in Milwaukee the suspension is absolutely abused on a daily basis.
owequitit
Profile for owequitit
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-05-2015 02:31
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
meyerk9 wrote:
Nothing is built how it used to be. The mass production really kills reliability in cars, as well as build quality. Realistically, your car is pretty old.

Try to find a TV, Cell Phone, toaster, coffee pot, etc that will last 11 years nowadays.

God it sucks but it's the world we live in.



Actually, mass production is good for reliability, especially with the increased use of automation these days because it improves quality control.

The only thing that has caused Honda's reliability to go down has been their continual efforts to "contain costs." They are now approaching the point where their reliability is no better than anyone else's, especially not when major things are starting to break at 100-120K.

Also, not being able to find quality stuff is not true. You just have to pay for quality. The old adage of "you get what you pay for" is as true today as it was yesterday. The problem today is that people think they are getting a better deal by paying $5 less for the plastic one because as Americans we now suck at seeing the longer term picture in many cases. I used to be willing to pay more for a Honda because I knew it was going to last. That isn't the case as much anymore.

Also, lifespan is relevant. No machine is going to last forever without an increase in maintenance and operating cost. That said, Honda USED to build their cars for a target 400K mile lifespan at average mileage. They are no longer doing that based on the rate that issues start to occur as the car ages. I have no issues getting my intend period of usage out of my Apple products. PC? Not so much.

meyerk9
Profile for meyerk9
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-05-2015 09:14
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
owequitit wrote:
meyerk9 wrote:
Nothing is built how it used to be. The mass production really kills reliability in cars, as well as build quality. Realistically, your car is pretty old.

Try to find a TV, Cell Phone, toaster, coffee pot, etc that will last 11 years nowadays.

God it sucks but it's the world we live in.



Actually, mass production is good for reliability, especially with the increased use of automation these days because it improves quality control.

The only thing that has caused Honda's reliability to go down has been their continual efforts to "contain costs." They are now approaching the point where their reliability is no better than anyone else's, especially not when major things are starting to break at 100-120K.

Also, not being able to find quality stuff is not true. You just have to pay for quality. The old adage of "you get what you pay for" is as true today as it was yesterday. The problem today is that people think they are getting a better deal by paying $5 less for the plastic one because as Americans we now suck at seeing the longer term picture in many cases. I used to be willing to pay more for a Honda because I knew it was going to last. That isn't the case as much anymore.

Also, lifespan is relevant. No machine is going to last forever without an increase in maintenance and operating cost. That said, Honda USED to build their cars for a target 400K mile lifespan at average mileage. They are no longer doing that based on the rate that issues start to occur as the car ages. I have no issues getting my intend period of usage out of my Apple products. PC? Not so much.



Quality control has gotten worse and worse over the years as they've been producing more and more cars.

Cylinder heads at 1500 miles?
Forgetting to torque connecting rod bolts?
Airbags missing rivets?
Debris from casting left in the engine block clogging heater cores?
Massive gashes in the beads of new tires?
Newer Accord with suspension noises where just tightening all of the major fasteners on the front suspension eliminates it?

All quality control issues that (according to the older guys I work with) "are unheard of" compared to 90s Hondas.

Don't get me wrong, cost cutting can also be seen very clearly. Aalthough the issues I see with new cars that aren't QC issues I'd say are split 50/50 with engineering faults and shitty parts that just fail (cheap parts).

As far as quality of everything else, you do get what you pay for. Hondas aren't exactly expensive compared to their competition. Unfortunately, Honda had to cut costs to compete while other makes had to dramatically increase costs and quality to compete at that same level. I think you'll have a hard time finding any car at any price point nowadays that will last like a 93 Accord.

But hey, you can go buy a Dodge Durango for about the same price as a Pilot. Some cars are simply better than others for the price, even today.




TLinTX
Profile for TLinTX
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-05-2015 10:30
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Good luck to you. I've always thought in the back of my mind that if my career abruptly ended that I could try my hand at selling cars for Acura as well.

Just prepare for some disillusionment: Selling cars, regardless of make, is a tough business. Your genuine enthusiasm and knowledge of the brand will help you be successful but your coworkers may become jealous and hold it against you. You'll find customers who are astonishingly cheap and make ridiculous demands. Pressures from the Sales Manager to meet certain goals will test your integrity.

I'd reach out to the TOVers in sales (A77x, NorCalSales) to get more insight. I really do wish you the best and hope it works out.

@lanta
Profile for @lanta
Sales position    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-05-2015 12:25
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
This is my first post on TOV. I have been following this site religiously for nearly four years now. What pushed me to finally make an account and join the discussion was the similarity of my situation to Hondatalover's.

I am also a senior in high school and recently landed a job at one of the Acura dealers in my area. I don't currently have a job and I really need one to save up spending money for college. I tried applying to various food places but the answer was always, "Sorry, we're currently 'at capacity'." Plus I shudder at the thought of being inside behind a register all day.

Both my mom and I drive MDX's, so about two weeks ago I was in charge of taking both cars in for service/parts. To make a long story short I ended up introducing myself to the sales manager and getting set up with a job as a "valet boy/carwash manager."

The difference here is that Hondaralover was able to prove his genuine interest and significant knowledge of the Acura brand to the sales guy. My interview, though it was quite in depth, never gave me the opportunity to prove how I knew each car on the lot inside and out. So that's obviously why a sales position was not on the table, but after reading about Hondatalover's experience I hope to be able to be offered the same opportunity.

My question is this: is it even possible for someone 18 years of age to hold a sales position? I feel like I could do a great job explaining every question a customer could have about any model on the lot. But am I even allowed to take people on test drives? I've been to this particular dealer plenty of times test driving different models with my dad and let me tell you, some of these sales reps have no idea what they're talking about. Some of the things they would say to us were just plain false. Their lack of knowledge truly surprised me! I made sure not to say anything out of respect, but man it was tough to keep a tight lip.

Sorry for the long post but I just wanted to get my story out there. If users like A77x or NorCalSales could fill the both of us in on what the story is here, it would be greatly appreciated! How cool it would be to work around the cars I love so much every single day...


@lanta
Profile for @lanta
Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-05-2015 12:29
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
This is my first post on TOV. I have been following this site religiously for nearly four years now. What pushed me to finally make an account and join the discussion was the similarity of my situation to Hondatalover's.

I am also a senior in high school and recently landed a job at one of the Acura dealers in my area. I don't currently have a job and I really need one to save up spending money for college. I tried applying to various food places but the answer was always, "Sorry, we're currently 'at capacity'." Plus I shudder at the thought of being inside behind a register all day.

Both my mom and I drive MDX's, so about two weeks ago I was in charge of taking both cars in for service/parts. To make a long story short I ended up introducing myself to the sales manager and getting set up with a job as a "valet boy/carwash manager."

The difference here is that Hondaralover was able to prove his genuine interest and significant knowledge of the Acura brand to the sales guy. My interview, though it was quite in depth, never gave me the opportunity to prove how I knew each car on the lot inside and out. So that's obviously why a sales position was not on the table, but after reading about Hondatalover's experience I hope to be able to be offered the same opportunity.

My question is this: is it even possible for someone 18 years of age to hold a sales position? I feel like I could do a great job explaining every question a customer could have about any model on the lot. But am I even allowed to take people on test drives? I've been to this particular dealer plenty of times test driving different models with my dad and let me tell you, some of these sales reps have no idea what they're talking about. Some of the things they would say to us were just plain false. Their lack of knowledge truly surprised me! I made sure not to say anything out of respect, but man it was tough to keep a tight lip.

Sorry for the long post but I just wanted to get my story out there. If users like A77x or NorCalSales could fill the both of us in on what the story is here, it would be greatly appreciated! How cool it would be to work around the cars I love so much every single day...

longhorn
Profile for longhorn
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-05-2015 12:44
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
@lanta wrote:
This is my first post on TOV. I have been following this site religiously for nearly four years now. What pushed me to finally make an account and join the discussion was the similarity of my situation to Hondatalover's.

I am also a senior in high school and recently landed a job at one of the Acura dealers in my area. I don't currently have a job and I really need one to save up spending money for college. I tried applying to various food places but the answer was always, "Sorry, we're currently 'at capacity'." Plus I shudder at the thought of being inside behind a register all day.

Both my mom and I drive MDX's, so about two weeks ago I was in charge of taking both cars in for service/parts. To make a long story short I ended up introducing myself to the sales manager and getting set up with a job as a "valet boy/carwash manager."

The difference here is that Hondaralover was able to prove his genuine interest and significant knowledge of the Acura brand to the sales guy. My interview, though it was quite in depth, never gave me the opportunity to prove how I knew each car on the lot inside and out. So that's obviously why a sales position was not on the table, but after reading about Hondatalover's experience I hope to be able to be offered the same opportunity.

My question is this: is it even possible for someone 18 years of age to hold a sales position? I feel like I could do a great job explaining every question a customer could have about any model on the lot. But am I even allowed to take people on test drives? I've been to this particular dealer plenty of times test driving different models with my dad and let me tell you, some of these sales reps have no idea what they're talking about. Some of the things they would say to us were just plain false. Their lack of knowledge truly surprised me! I made sure not to say anything out of respect, but man it was tough to keep a tight lip.

Sorry for the long post but I just wanted to get my story out there. If users like A77x or NorCalSales could fill the both of us in on what the story is here, it would be greatly appreciated! How cool it would be to work around the cars I love so much every single day...



As a customer, I could care less how old you are as long you were competent and dressed the part (its amazing how sloppy dress attire has become). Knowledge is the key, its hard to trust a salesperson when one knows more about the product than they do.

Grace141
Profile for Grace141
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-05-2015 13:43
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Has anyone here heard of "decoking" an engine head? How about a routine "valve job"? I know it looks like modern cars aren't very reliable or maintenance free but keep in mind that even many of those '70s Datsuns so many folks appreciate today had 2k mile valve lash adjustment intervals and electrics which would have been at home in a British car. An air-cooled Beetle would drive through any winter storm at -40 F but it would vapor lock leaving you at the side of the road in the summer. How about the terms "pinging" or "pinking"?

Okay, how about 30k mile intervals on piston ring replacements? Take a look through any of the magazines published in the 1930s and 1940s. Some of the leading advertisors of the time were replacement piston and piston ring manufacturers such as Perfect Circle of Indiana. Let's not even talk about Nylon-corded bias-ply tires which were good for 20k miles.

My favorite story of all though is that of the brand new for 1954 Ford Y-block family with built-in oil starvation for the top end. Nearly every last one of those engines failed before its time and the big Fords from the '50s having matching numbers are practically non-existent today.

When you look at the number of parts in modern cars and the low percentage of those parts being prone to failure you see both advancements in material technologies and in manufacturing techniques. Owning a car has always been expensive and few of the Hondas today are as bullet-proof as they were years ago but, still, it's a pretty good time in history to be interested in cars.

owequitit
Profile for owequitit
Re: Everything at once.    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-05-2015 14:07
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
meyerk9 wrote:
owequitit wrote:
meyerk9 wrote:
Nothing is built how it used to be. The mass production really kills reliability in cars, as well as build quality. Realistically, your car is pretty old.

Try to find a TV, Cell Phone, toaster, coffee pot, etc that will last 11 years nowadays.

God it sucks but it's the world we live in.



Actually, mass production is good for reliability, especially with the increased use of automation these days because it improves quality control.

The only thing that has caused Honda's reliability to go down has been their continual efforts to "contain costs." They are now approaching the point where their reliability is no better than anyone else's, especially not when major things are starting to break at 100-120K.

Also, not being able to find quality stuff is not true. You just have to pay for quality. The old adage of "you get what you pay for" is as true today as it was yesterday. The problem today is that people think they are getting a better deal by paying $5 less for the plastic one because as Americans we now suck at seeing the longer term picture in many cases. I used to be willing to pay more for a Honda because I knew it was going to last. That isn't the case as much anymore.

Also, lifespan is relevant. No machine is going to last forever without an increase in maintenance and operating cost. That said, Honda USED to build their cars for a target 400K mile lifespan at average mileage. They are no longer doing that based on the rate that issues start to occur as the car ages. I have no issues getting my intend period of usage out of my Apple products. PC? Not so much.



Quality control has gotten worse and worse over the years as they've been producing more and more cars.

Cylinder heads at 1500 miles?
Forgetting to torque connecting rod bolts?
Airbags missing rivets?
Debris from casting left in the engine block clogging heater cores?
Massive gashes in the beads of new tires?
Newer Accord with suspension noises where just tightening all of the major fasteners on the front suspension eliminates it?

All quality control issues that (according to the older guys I work with) "are unheard of" compared to 90s Hondas.

Don't get me wrong, cost cutting can also be seen very clearly. Aalthough the issues I see with new cars that aren't QC issues I'd say are split 50/50 with engineering faults and shitty parts that just fail (cheap parts).

As far as quality of everything else, you do get what you pay for. Hondas aren't exactly expensive compared to their competition. Unfortunately, Honda had to cut costs to compete while other makes had to dramatically increase costs and quality to compete at that same level. I think you'll have a hard time finding any car at any price point nowadays that will last like a 93 Accord.

But hey, you can go buy a Dodge Durango for about the same price as a Pilot. Some cars are simply better than others for the price, even today.






It isn't a result of mass production. It is a result of forcing the suppliers to build the same part for cheaper. There is a massive difference.

Hondatalover
Profile for Hondatalover
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-05-2015 16:40
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
@lanta wrote:
This is my first post on TOV. I have been following this site religiously for nearly four years now. What pushed me to finally make an account and join the discussion was the similarity of my situation to Hondatalover's.

I am also a senior in high school and recently landed a job at one of the Acura dealers in my area. I don't currently have a job and I really need one to save up spending money for college. I tried applying to various food places but the answer was always, "Sorry, we're currently 'at capacity'." Plus I shudder at the thought of being inside behind a register all day.

Both my mom and I drive MDX's, so about two weeks ago I was in charge of taking both cars in for service/parts. To make a long story short I ended up introducing myself to the sales manager and getting set up with a job as a "valet boy/carwash manager."

The difference here is that Hondaralover was able to prove his genuine interest and significant knowledge of the Acura brand to the sales guy. My interview, though it was quite in depth, never gave me the opportunity to prove how I knew each car on the lot inside and out. So that's obviously why a sales position was not on the table, but after reading about Hondatalover's experience I hope to be able to be offered the same opportunity.

My question is this: is it even possible for someone 18 years of age to hold a sales position? I feel like I could do a great job explaining every question a customer could have about any model on the lot. But am I even allowed to take people on test drives? I've been to this particular dealer plenty of times test driving different models with my dad and let me tell you, some of these sales reps have no idea what they're talking about. Some of the things they would say to us were just plain false. Their lack of knowledge truly surprised me! I made sure not to say anything out of respect, but man it was tough to keep a tight lip.

Sorry for the long post but I just wanted to get my story out there. If users like A77x or NorCalSales could fill the both of us in on what the story is here, it would be greatly appreciated! How cool it would be to work around the cars I love so much every single day...



Sweet! I got you to sign up and comment! Welcome :)

I also looked at the prep boy/ valet jobs but wasn't sure. I like people and I really like when someone listens to me and understands everything and to top it off make a purchase. So I figured sales would be good.

I'm scared of my coworkers getting jealous over me and having that negative atmosphere of "That kid keeps selling more cars than me and he doesn't have half the sales experience as I do".

The salesman that I talked to with the ILX Aspec last month was extremely nice and close to my age. He's the one who brought up me getting a job with them. Maybe he just liked me and thought I was cool for my enthusiasm... because I wouldn't offer a 'customer' a job that would risk my own commission on total pay. I knew more than he did I feel like. I'm probably just deeper into Honda's than he was and he just knew the stuff they taught him after being hired.

I really want a interview to pop up soon.

A77X
Profile for A77X
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-05-2015 22:59
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
I don't think it is necessarily a disadvantage to be 18 or whatever - so much depends on the individual. We had one 18 year old who started soon after I did and was probably more mature than I am. Did very well. Treat people with respect, good product knowledge, no BS, and, key thing this, tell people you are new and learning and if you don't know the answer promise to find out and deliver on that promise. People often prefer new staff (not yet brainwashed, don't yet know the tricks of the trade kind of thing). Follow up is crucial - accept that a lot of people are just not ready to buy. Amazing the number of sales people who don't bother. Focus on what people are looking for and what matters to them. Product knowledge is important but don't get carried away with it. Just focus on trying to find out what the customer cares about, what they like and don't like about their current vehicle, why are they looking at a Honda? That sort of thing. I try not to rubbish the competition (Corolla excepted there's far less rubbish out there now!).

We have to go with our customers on test drives (some insurance stipulation apparently), don't see why being 18 years old makes any difference.

$250 a car sounds rough....the industry aim is 9 per sales person per month. 9 times $250....I had never done car sales before this job (was meant to be temporary till I found a proper job, but I started at a good time (2006) and sales were good, and so was money. Then. Far, far harder now. Margins are much smaller, sales haven't increased but number of dealerships has. We have gone away from straight commission to flat fees, but more than $250. But all of life involves selling one way or another and it will be a very good experience for you.

Just a few rambling thoughts

@lanta
Profile for @lanta
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-05-2015 23:44
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Thank you so much for your insight. It will serve as a tremendous help moving forward. It's comforting to know that someone our age has held a position like this before. Do you know what they did to convince the sales managers that they were prepared for the job? I'm guessing it is a matter of proving your knowledge and competence to them, like Hondatalover was able to do while on his test drive.

One of the managers at my dealership plans to speak with me face to face sometime soon. I want to show him that I'm worthy for something greater than "valet boy." Albeit in the most respectful and professional way possible!

Jesse
Profile for Jesse
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-06-2015 04:21
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
^ Hope you'll get the job you desire. If not, everyone has different circumstances. Working behind a register is much better IMO than washing dishes at a restaurant - I did the latter and it was challenging. But it pays the bills while looking for that Graphic Designer + Web Developer job, which eventually I did get it.
Funky Chicken
Profile for Funky Chicken
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-06-2015 11:44
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
I have made my living in the car business for 28 years, 24 of them at Honda/Acura dealerships. I have sold, managed, trained, and done F&I. I have packed up and moved my family 500 miles to take a sales job on 100% commission. I am very comfortable financially and I owe it all to the car business. I started at age 21 working at a Honda dealership where my family had done business. I am 50 now and still doing it.
Here is what I will share with any young ToVers considering getting into the car business.
I have seen countless car "enthusiasts" enter the business with an encyclopedic knowledge of Honda/Acura folklore and products. With VERY few exceptions they failed.
The car business is not really about cars. It's about people.
If you approach the business thinking that being an enthusiast will help you sell cars, you will fail.
The 58 year old woman pulling up in a 15 year old Infiniti I30 doesn't care about what you know, or about any of the things that excite people on these forums.
It would be great to think that you are going to find that people who share your enthusiasm for the product that also have $40K and up car budgets, but most of them don't.
If you take a job selling Acuras, you will be attempting to convince people to buy a product that has a median price over $40,000. The bulk of your sales will be SUVs. I can count on one hand the number of cars with a manual transmission I have sold in the last 5 years. I never sold a single 6 speed ILX in the two years they were available. I never sold a single ZDX, and I had 7 years worth of previous Acura clients to call when it came out.
The best training I ever received about how to sell cars came from a guy by the name of Joe Verde. When you first hear what he has to say you will think it is way too simple-minded and hokey-I did.
In a nutshell, people buy cars from people who they know, like, and trust. You need to get to know a customer and try to find common ground with them before they will trust you. If you can't imaging finding common ground with a 58 year old woman, don't bother getting into the car business.
You want to know who asks me about 0-60 times and stopping distances? Nobody. You want to know what percentage of people what to know how many horsepower a given car has? Maybe 1 in 10.
I have a guy working with me right now who is a self described "huge auto enthusiast". He sucks at selling cars because he can't separate himself from his passion and he honestly believes that he can get a customer to care about racing and performance the way he does. He talks about rev matching downshifts with 60 year old people looking at RDXs. He insists on answering questions that people are not asking, and he doesn't listen to people. He is in love with the sound of his own voice.
He is just another "tourist"-in the car business because he failed at whatever he did before this. It's easy to get a job selling cars, because very few people want to do this job. The hours are long. The income is unpredictable. You have to manage your money very well.
You have to be self-disciplined and actually come to work TO WORK. You have to be able to talk to all kinds of people and make them think you are genuinely interested in THEM and THEIR needs and not just making a sale.
There are thousands of losers selling cars who just get by, living week to week. Those are the people who give selling cars the reputation it has. Then there are people who put their heads down and build their own business. Those are the people who get phone calls from old customers and referrals. Those are the people who make more money per car because they sell a higher percentage of repeat and referral business. Those are the people who can work fewer hours and don't have to stay late in order to meet a quota.
None of the most successful car salesmen you meet operate from the position of being a fan or enthusiast-they all operate from the position of being an entrepreneur who runs their own business under someone else's roof.
Think about it. I have nearly 200 cars in inventory to sell that I don't pay to keep in stock. My phone and computer are provided and the bills are paid. I have a desk that I didn't buy. My personal overhead to operate my business is nearly zero. I have service and parts at my disposal. None of this costs me a dime.
This can be the greatest job in the world if you don't come in thinking that you are going to reinvent what it is really about. What it is about is being a person that people know, like, trust, and want to do business with. Everything else is secondary.

rstsxcrv
Profile for rstsxcrv
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-06-2015 12:33
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
I wish I had met somebody like FC in my brief tenure as a car salesman.

Everything he/she says is true....

I was an "enthusiast" and nobody gives 2 cents all that book knowledge we know. It ends up going nowhere. You learn to know people, their personalities, and what they care about.

I had a lady tell me she would buy any model on the lot, she just wanted to know what I recommended and why. This is a perfect use case, because if I didn't understand her as a person, and started rambling about leather interiors, horsepower, keyless startup, she would have walked right out. If I had been paying attention to the fact that she had a dog, had a smaller garage, and didn't want a "SUV" kind of vehicle, (which I did), I would have, and ultimately did sell her a car.

It's fun - you're around new Honda/Acuras all day. Make sure you're a good driver because if you damage a car more often than not you are going to get fired unless you're a superstar. Don't expect to make friends - like FC said, people are there to make money. If I work with you, I want the same customer, especially if it's a Monday afternoon and you've got 8 salespeople and maybe 2 customers out in the lot. Learn the ropes, stick with it if you can. Ultimately, it wasn't a financially smart proposition for me and didn't fulfill what I wanted. But it's all relative. If you enjoy it - you will know within the first 2 months. But you have to give it some time - granted you can live a few weeks off no income while you learn.

Waldo
Profile for Waldo
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-06-2015 12:46
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Funky Chicken, very sage words, indeed, from a professional who truly understands sales. Your essay should be required reading, not only for aspiring cars sales people, but for any sales person.

It is also a cogent explanation why the stuff that matters to enthusiasts has little bearing on the success of a brand. The brand itself is an uber-salesman, having to earn trust and likability as a prequel to you performing your job.

DCR
Profile for DCR
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-06-2015 13:01
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Funky Chicken wrote:

Great advice


You saved me quite a bit of typing, so thanks for that. Your advice is 100% accurate in my opinion.

When I worked in home and car audio sales, I was definitely a car audio enthusiast prior to selling, as I had been installing car audio since around age 15. When I started selling, I was a bit confused because product knowledge and all of the technical ability in the world translates to absolute dick on the sales floor. Don't get me wrong...it is important to be educated, but it is not important to use it out right all the time like you have to prove something.

Try explaining to a customer why they need a certain amplifier to drive a particular subwoofer at a 1 ohm load and how to wire the voice coils. Try explaining why a $100 Boss amp that is rated at 1000 watts at some ridiculous voltage isn't really pushing 1000 watts, and that your $800 amplifier that is rated at 400 watts is actually a better unit. Clipping, wire gauges, what a crossover does, and on and on and on and on. You'll dry that sort of thing up real fast, and start to explain things like "this amplifier was designed specifically to drive this model of subwoofer, and my installers are certified to hook all up so you just turn up the volume and go".

If you want to ruin a hobby, get a job doing that.

I loved car audio, but I hated selling it. Very few customers cared as much as I did about the products, and if they did, they were over the top "know it alls" that I wanted to punt out the door. I had extensive product knowledge, but I also learned pretty quickly that customers didn't want to hear it unless it was relevant to the conversation.

One of the owners of the store I worked at when I moved to Grand Rapids was an absolutely incredible salesman. John was a people person first, and built his entire sales portfolio from getting to know the customers. I watched him sell a $15k Pioneer Elite plasma TV to a couple and I honestly don't even remember them talking about the TV until the sale was closed, and that conversation was him asking the wife, "You sure your husband needs this TV?", all with a smile. He had built up such a clientele that he was never alone during store hours...he always had someone in there taking a box home.

Also, and this is one point I cannot stress enough...never, ever judge a book by the cover. If a customer comes in with ripped jeans and a weather beaten fishing hat, you better treat them like they are wearing a new suit. Never view a customer as one customer either...everyone has friends and family and that can spider web quite far if the customer is treated well.

For me personally, I simply have to like the salesman that is in front of me. If I get attitude, or a slew of product info I didn't ask about, I will not buy from them. For my car purchases, which are all from one particular dealer here in town, I literally do nothing but sign the papers. My guy will text me when they get something he knows I may like, and I will text him back if I want it. I bought my 2010 Si this way...I didn't even see the car until I went to pick it up and sign off. I don't haggle on price because they give me a good deal without me asking. I am zero work for them, and this is what can happen if you establish some trust and for many customers, they will be back instead of one and done.

It is even to the point where I felt bad that my wife bought a Nissan instead of a Honda this time. However, in a strange twist of fate, John is the top salesman at the place I bought it. :)

DCR
Profile for DCR
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-06-2015 13:26
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Waldo wrote:
Funky Chicken, very sage words, indeed, from a professional who truly understands sales. Your essay should be required reading, not only for aspiring cars sales people, but for any sales person.

It is also a cogent explanation why the stuff that matters to enthusiasts has little bearing on the success of a brand. The brand itself is an uber-salesman, having to earn trust and likability as a prequel to you performing your job.



I am going to stop that thought right there.

The ONLY reason my parents own a CR-V is because of my enthusiast roots in the Honda world. Why did my wife have 7 Honda vehicles in a row? How about my buddy with the Fit I told him to buy instead of a Ford? I could get my sales buddy from Rivertown Honda on here and have him tell you how many people I have referred there from work, and elsewhere.

I don't know why this is so difficult for some of you to understand.

longhorn
Profile for longhorn
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-06-2015 14:06
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Funky Chicken wrote:
I have made my living in the car business for 28 years, 24 of them at Honda/Acura dealerships. I have sold, managed, trained, and done F&I. I have packed up and moved my family 500 miles to take a sales job on 100% commission. I am very comfortable financially and I owe it all to the car business. I started at age 21 working at a Honda dealership where my family had done business. I am 50 now and still doing it.
Here is what I will share with any young ToVers considering getting into the car business.
I have seen countless car "enthusiasts" enter the business with an encyclopedic knowledge of Honda/Acura folklore and products. With VERY few exceptions they failed.
The car business is not really about cars. It's about people.
If you approach the business thinking that being an enthusiast will help you sell cars, you will fail.
The 58 year old woman pulling up in a 15 year old Infiniti I30 doesn't care about what you know, or about any of the things that excite people on these forums.
It would be great to think that you are going to find that people who share your enthusiasm for the product that also have $40K and up car budgets, but most of them don't.
If you take a job selling Acuras, you will be attempting to convince people to buy a product that has a median price over $40,000. The bulk of your sales will be SUVs. I can count on one hand the number of cars with a manual transmission I have sold in the last 5 years. I never sold a single 6 speed ILX in the two years they were available. I never sold a single ZDX, and I had 7 years worth of previous Acura clients to call when it came out.
The best training I ever received about how to sell cars came from a guy by the name of Joe Verde. When you first hear what he has to say you will think it is way too simple-minded and hokey-I did.
In a nutshell, people buy cars from people who they know, like, and trust. You need to get to know a customer and try to find common ground with them before they will trust you. If you can't imaging finding common ground with a 58 year old woman, don't bother getting into the car business.
You want to know who asks me about 0-60 times and stopping distances? Nobody. You want to know what percentage of people what to know how many horsepower a given car has? Maybe 1 in 10.
I have a guy working with me right now who is a self described "huge auto enthusiast". He sucks at selling cars because he can't separate himself from his passion and he honestly believes that he can get a customer to care about racing and performance the way he does. He talks about rev matching downshifts with 60 year old people looking at RDXs. He insists on answering questions that people are not asking, and he doesn't listen to people. He is in love with the sound of his own voice.
He is just another "tourist"-in the car business because he failed at whatever he did before this. It's easy to get a job selling cars, because very few people want to do this job. The hours are long. The income is unpredictable. You have to manage your money very well.
You have to be self-disciplined and actually come to work TO WORK. You have to be able to talk to all kinds of people and make them think you are genuinely interested in THEM and THEIR needs and not just making a sale.
There are thousands of losers selling cars who just get by, living week to week. Those are the people who give selling cars the reputation it has. Then there are people who put their heads down and build their own business. Those are the people who get phone calls from old customers and referrals. Those are the people who make more money per car because they sell a higher percentage of repeat and referral business. Those are the people who can work fewer hours and don't have to stay late in order to meet a quota.
None of the most successful car salesmen you meet operate from the position of being a fan or enthusiast-they all operate from the position of being an entrepreneur who runs their own business under someone else's roof.
Think about it. I have nearly 200 cars in inventory to sell that I don't pay to keep in stock. My phone and computer are provided and the bills are paid. I have a desk that I didn't buy. My personal overhead to operate my business is nearly zero. I have service and parts at my disposal. None of this costs me a dime.
This can be the greatest job in the world if you don't come in thinking that you are going to reinvent what it is really about. What it is about is being a person that people know, like, trust, and want to do business with. Everything else is secondary.



I guess I am just different. I want you as a salesperson to sell me on the car, tell me something I do not know about the car. I am in the demo group that does research before walking into a dealership. Please tell me Funky Chicken, you are not the kind of salesman that tries to be my friend. Because when I am sitting at your desk I could care less about the pictures of your family and no, I do not want to talk about them. Just need someone to do the deal, get me through finance, and not spend more than 4 hours at a dealership. Do that, and I will sing your praises to friends and family. I consider myself to be the low maintenance customer, yeah I know I am not in the majority.

With that stated, I know Funky Chicken is 100% correct in regards to the majority of customers. Its a shame we can't make that post a sticky, it is required reading. Thanks again for posting it Funky Chicken.

longhorn
Profile for longhorn
Re: Sales Position at Acura    (Score: 1, Normal) 05-06-2015 14:15
Reply to This Message Attach Quote to Reply
Waldo wrote:
Funky Chicken, very sage words, indeed, from a professional who truly understands sales. Your essay should be required reading, not only for aspiring cars sales people, but for any sales person.

It is also a cogent explanation why the stuff that matters to enthusiasts has little bearing on the success of a brand. The brand itself is an uber-salesman, having to earn trust and likability as a prequel to you performing your job.



IMO, the enthusiast or Tuner from the late 80s to the early 90s had a "part" too in the rise of Honda. When 18 year olds are gobbling up older Hondas to "tune" them, it does have an effect on resale value.

Honda would never acknowledge this publicly, wanting to distance itself from the tuner crowd (illegal street racing had a big part of this and subsequent accidents). I think the latest "back to basics" Honda we are seeing is evidence Honda is trying to reignite that same fire.


 
Thread Page - [1] 2 3
Go to:
Contact TOV | Submit Your Article | Submit Your Link | Advertise | TOV Shop | Events | Our Sponsors | TOV Archives
Copyright © 2018 Velocitech Inc. All information contained herein remains the property of Velocitech Inc.
The Temple of VTEC is not affiliated with American Honda Motor Co., Inc. TOV Policies and Guidelines - Credits - Privacy Policy
29 mobile: 0